Kingdom Rush (Review)

I’m a big fan of tower defense games when they are done right. Crystal Defenders, Dungeon Defenders, and Plants vs Zombies are by far my favourites of the genre, but a little flash game known as Kingdom Rush has been giving all three a run for their money.

Kingdom Rush is, as a whole, a pretty standard tower defense game. You get four different types of towers (archer towers, artillery cannons, barracks, and mage towers) which all serve different purposes and can be upgraded as you progress through the game.

Archer towers are, naturally, posts that shoot out a steady barrage of arrows at enemies. They can hit flying enemies, which makes them a valuable asset when waves of flying baddies appear later on.

Barracks train crews of soldiers to block roads and combat any enemies that come within range. When barracks are upgraded, they train stronger soldiers. Deploying soldiers throughout the level works brilliantly as a way to stall the enemies at on certain junctions and roads. Have a stretch of road where your towers deal lots of damage? Throw some barracks down to keep the enemies there longer!

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Mage towers are pretty uninteresting early in the game, but when you unlock their final upgrades, they become very enjoyable and helpful towers that allow you to create giant golems, turn enemies into sheep, and shoot death rays. They’re a very versatile (and helpful) tower towards the end of the game.

Artillery cannons are essentially just very large cannons that deal massive area of effect damage to enemies. These towers are perhaps the most lethal in terms of raw damage, but their slow attack speed balances things out so that they aren’t terribly overpowered. This will change when you max out the upgrades on a level 4 cannon though. Once you start firing homing missiles across the map and light entire roadways on fire, you know that nothing’s going to be messing with you!

If your towers are having trouble keeping a wave at bay, you can call upon reinforcements to help you out. They have a short cooldown and can be used very often, but reinforcements are initially quite weak and are nothing but a very brief stalling tactic at the start of the game (though they work wonderfully when paired when soldiers from barracks).

Another power you can use, which has a sixty second cooldown, is the ability to rain meteors down upon your opponents. Yes, meteors. This power deals an insane amount of damage to anything it hits and, chances are that unless you are using the power on the toughest enemies in the game, you’ll kill whatever you target in one go.

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The objective is to, of course, keep the enemies from reaching the end of the road. You have twenty hearts that you have to protect and, whenever an enemy slips through your towers and reaches the end, you’ll lose one heart. Some larger enemies will force you to lose more than one. When you lose all twenty hearts, it’s game over. Ideally, you will want to finish levels with all twenty hearts which allows you to unlock bonus challenges for each level.

Whenever you beat a level, you will be awarded with upgrade points which can be spent on, of course, upgrades for your towers and special powers. Most upgrades will just increase the power and range of your towers, but the upgrades for your meteors and reinforcements are much more interesting. Max out your reinforcements and they will become tough soldiers gain the ability to throw spears at flying enemies. Fully upgraded meteors gain the awesome ability to not only rain down longer, but can randomly hit all across the map as well.

Kingdom Rush isn’t a terribly long game, having only about twelve or so levels (plus two premium levels that you must pay to unlock). If you are only playing to breeze through the game’s story then you won’t be playing for too long. However, if you are looking to beat each level as well as the two challenges for each and every one, then you’ll be busy for a long time as you will essentially be increasing the length of the game by three.

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For a flash game, Kingdom Rush is exceptionally good. The gameplay is absolutely top notch, and the graphics and sound are pretty impressive for a game of this kind. The graphics aren’t extremely advanced and are basic 2D, but there was a lot of care taken in spriting everything in this game and it shows. The music is also a lot of fun to listen to and is actually, as a whole, much more enjoyable than what I hear in quite a few commercial games.

If you’re a fan of tower defense games, then giving Kingdom Rush a try is a no brainer. Considering it’s fully free to play (though unlocking premium content costs money, as does acquiring the game on the iPad), there’s no reason for you not to try this game. An even greater incentive to try this game is the fact that the developers have promised later additions and expansions to the game. This is without a doubt one of the better flash games that I have played.

Final Score

8.5/10

Pros:
+ Bonus challenges add lots of replayability.
+ Gameplay is top notch for a tower defense game.
+ Great music and sound effects for a flash game.

Cons:
– Difficulty is not consistent throughout the game.
– Game could have been longer.
– Premium content feels tacked on.

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Game Dev Story (Review)

Why are you reading this review instead of playing the game?!

Throughout 2011, I heard about Game Dev Story an awful lot. Professional reviewers were praising the game and apparently it was selling really well on app stores. Well, about half a year after the game’s release on iOS, I decided to dust my iPod Touch off and check the game out.

So, what is Game Dev Story? A very basic summary is that you are in charge of a video game development company (games, staffing, etc.) and must turn it into an industry crushing behemoth! Does this sound fun? Well if you have a fondness for simulation games (think anything by Maxis) or just video game development in general, then this game should definitely appeal to you.

Players start off with a pretty small office to work out of and, right off the bat, your secretary will ask you to hire three employees to get the company started. Potential hirees all come with various silly names that poke fun at the entertainment industry (Donny Jepp, Stephen Jobson, Walt Sidney). These NPCs all have job-specific titles such as coder, producer, writer, and so forth. Each title implies what field the characters excel at. Each hirable NPC also has four main statistics – programming, scenario, graphics, and sound. These four statistics will, ultimately, be the deciding factors in who you hire and who you give passes to. They will determine how good your employees are at designing your games. The programming statistic generally improves overall development of the games and the proposal writing of each game. Scenario affects how creative your games will be, which is vital in the grand scheme of the game. Graphics and sound are, predictably, the graphics and sound of your games.

Players will have to choose which consoles are right to develop for and when.

When you start, employees will have very low statistics. Because of this fact you should not expect your games to succeed very much in the beginning and they will, at best, just cover lost expenses.However, as you gradually make more money off of your stinkers that you release, you’ll be able to level up and train your employees so that they become more skilled. Leveling up is pretty basic and simply uses research points, a sort of currency you earn from simply working on and debugging games. Training is a different story and requires you to spend your company’s actual money. You can choose various activities for your employees to train in, and all will increase at least one of the four statistics possessed by them. Eventually, simply leveling and training your employees becomes less and less beneficial over time and, once they appear to be at their limits without having oodles of cash thrown into training them, you have to command your secretary to bring in a batch of new applicants who are hopeful to work for you. In most cases, you will have to fire an existing employee to hire a new one, but this is rarely a problem since the new employees are usually better except for very late in the game. The only downside to firing long time employees is that you may feel a little sad letting go of an employee that you’ve had working for your company since the start of the game.

In terms of actually making games, there is a fun amount of options here. You get to choose the console to develop for along with the game’s name, genre, and theme. Want to make a cowboy RPG called Space Goons? Feel free to do that! If the RPG genre and cowboy theme are both popular at the time of the game’s development, then Space Goons could easily become a smash hit! As the years go by, the general public will be more partial to certain genres and themes than others. One year they may want action games and the next they might want racing games. It is not essential to give the public what they want because, if your staff is skilled enough, the game will succeed regardless. Still, adhering to the demands of the public will usually always net you at least 25% more in overall sales. You really can’t say no to that, can you?

Winning the coveted grand prize at the Global Game Awards will be high on your list of objectives to fulfill.

Every now and then, new consoles will be announced by companies that parody real life corporations (Senga releases the Exodus, Sonny will unveil the Playstatus, etc.) and you will have to pay handsome licensing fees to develop for these new devices. Since older consoles will eventually become obsolete and stop selling entirely, it is essentially to jump ship to newer and better consoles when you have the funds available to do so.

There are two annual events that are eventually introduced which also parody real life counterparts. GameDex is an annual convention that is clearly Game Dev Story’s version of E3. You can choose how much to spend on your company’s booth and presentation at Game Dex, or you can choose not to go entirely. This will, however, affect your popularity with the fanbase you’ve amassed over time. The second event is the Global Game Awards. This is basically the Oscars, but for games. There are a few categories to win (including the silly “worst game of the year”), but players will ultimately want their games to win the grand prize of the award show which is simply titled “the grand prize.” By winning it, you will be rewarded with a nice one million dollar prize. This is very helpful at the start of the game, but tends to feel pretty miniscule later on. The problem with this is that you are incredibly unlikely to win the grand prize for a few years at least and, when you do, it just isn’t much of a big deal anymore.

In terms of presentation, I have to commend this game for having a very cute look to it that is a breeze to navigate. Graphics are very reminiscent of the 16 bit era and are exceptionally easy on the eyes. Since Game Dev Story is a Japanese developed game, you can of course expect a few colourful and silly looking scenes which should make you smile. The sound of the game is a different story though, and I had to turn the music off within minutes of playing. It truly is horrendous to listen to, and the sound effects are only marginally better.

Fictional magazine reviewers will rate your games upon release and this can drastically affect your sales.

Ignoring the fact that this game has pretty bad music and sound effects, the rest of the package is really incredible. If you like simulation titles, then you will have a lot of trouble putting this game down as you will frequently find yourself saying “I’ll just make one more game, but then I have to get up” only to find yourself making five, six, maybe seven more games before you manage to put your iOS device down! The gameplay truly is addictive, but in a very pleasant way. Is Game Dev Story worth checking out? Without a doubt. Hop to it, folks!

Pros:
+ Amazing replay value with each game being a new experience.
+ Graphics are charming, cute, and simple.
+ Very easy game to pick up and play with no prior experience.

Cons:
– The sound is bad. Really, really bad. Final score isn’t 9+ because of it alone.
– Certain gameplay aspects become pointless over time.
– It’s not available to console and PC gamers!

Final Score

8.6/10